Globulin

Overview

Globulins are a group of proteins in the blood stream that help to regulate the function of the circulatory system. If the globulin level in the blood is abnormal it can lead to health trouble.


Your globulin levels will affect the amount of ample proteins in the blood stream. If these proteins are not kept at the proper ration, it can be difficult for the body to properly fight infection, clot or transport nutrients to the muscles, leading to health difficulties for the patient.


Medical examinations must be done to determine if the globulin levels are where they should be, and what might be causing them to be lower or higher than normal. Medications can then be used to help return the globulin levels to the normal stage to avoid any potential dangers.


Globulin Levels

Tests will be used to determine the specific levels of different types of globulin in the blood stream. Ideally, this level will fall at 7.5 g/dL. This should be comprised approximately of 3.5-5 gm/dL of albumin and 2.3-3.5 gm/dL of globulin.


  • Low Globulin Levels. If the globulin levels fall below this normal range it can be a sign of several serious health conditions. Renal disease, hepatic dysfunction, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and acute hemolytic anemia can cause the globulin levels to drop. This is also a sign that proteins taken in by the digestive system are not being broken down or absorbed properly.
  • High globulin levels. Those with high globulin levels may be suffering from leukemia or other bone marrow disorders, autoimmunity diseases such as lupus or collagen diseases, chronic inflammatory diseases such as syphilis, waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, liver disease, Rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis, kidney disease or a chronic viral or bacterial infection. Further testing will be necessary to determine which of these disorders is causing the globulin levels to rise so adequate treatment can be administered.